Archive for the ‘Mote-Evolver’ Category

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out now: Psyk – Silent Witness EP [Mote-Evolver]

November 1, 2017
 

Artist:
Psyk

 

Title:
Silent Witness EP

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTE051

 

Release Date:
24th November 2017

 

Format:
12inch & digital

 

Tracklist:
A1)
Disorder

A2)
Silent Witness

B1)
Apart

B2)
Surrender

 

Press Info:
The working relationship between producer Psyk (a.k.a. Manuel Anós) and Mote-Evolver continues with the new Silent Witness EP, another episode showcasing Psyk’s expert balance of technical variance and affective consistency.

The EP title brings to mind the kind of frozen state of awe that accompanies intense, revelatory experiences of all kinds, and the careful build-up of each individual track here allows plenty of room for such a state to come about. Put another way, Psyk’s simple but dense constructions rise and fall with a perfect, patient arcing motion that make the music feel very much like a first contact with some uncanny new form of intelligence. “Disorder,” for example, leads in with a curiosity-provoking combo of rubbery kick drum and gated synth sounds that seem like sonic accompaniment for observing the conduction of electricity across neuronal pathways. Its gradual intensification, via shivering and cleanly spaced cymbal accents and writhing / restless synth drone, acts like a microscope onto equally colorful imagined scenarios. The title track follows on this with a similar tempo and probing mood, but this time with sharper rhythmic edges, crisp hi-hats and swells that rise like mist over a darkened body of water.

“Apart” inaugurates the B-side with a classic club sound; one reliant on chaining together micro-snippets of sound into something epic and expansive. As with the previous two cuts, a master tone glides over this assemblage of tiny machines and sees that it reaches a satisfying conclusion. “Surrender” then ends this particular voyage with a vertiginous, omnipresent sequence guiding the way through a synthetic wilderness where chromed mandibles clack together and where hallucinated alert sounds lend an air of lurking danger.

Longtime fans of Psyk will find Silent Witness to be a very worthy addition to his catalogue, and also a worhty addition to any DJ sets that desire to mix raw energy with a carefully tailored sense of sophistication.

 

Listen:

 

Special:
“@ PAL 23-09-2017”

 

Recommendations:
EP “Distane” on Mote-Evolver
EP “Human” on Mote-Evolver
EP “First Contact” on Fuse Music
EP “Works” on Tresor Records

 

Buy Vinyl:
deejay.de
Red Eye Records
HHV
Hardwax
Juno
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
soon

 

Booking:
Triangle Agency

 

Websites:
Psyk
Mote-Evolver
Mote-Evolver @ Facebook

 
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out now: Planetary Assault Systems – Deep Heet Vol. 4 [Mote-Evolver]

September 18, 2017
 

Artist:
Planetary Assault Systems

 

Title:
Deep Heet Vol. 4

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTE050

 

Release Date:
13th October 2017

 

Format:
vinyl & digital

 

Tracklist Vinyl:
A1.
Desert Races

A2.
Life Rhythm

B1.
Random Kingdom

B2.
Lazer Organical

 

Press Info:
Since 2006, the Deep Heet series of recordings has shown the public an especially distinctive side of the production work of Planetary Assault Systems. With a unique ‘engine room’ ambience and a focus upon maintaining a continual surge of pure energy, each volume in the Deep Heet collection has lived up to that title, subtly suggesting the kind of sustained and voluntary temperature rise that has traditionally given way to spiritual or visionary experiences. Just check out tracks such as “Flat Tire” from Volume 3, with its hard percussive edge accompanied by a pervasive hiss like boiling matter changing into gas. P.A.S. helmsman Luke Slater also thinks highly enough of this series to re-work tracks like “Whistle Viper” in recent live sets, or to offer up others (e.g. “Raid”) for remixing by Mote-Evolver allies.

It’s only appropriate, then, that the 50th overall release on Mote-Evolver should also be the fourth overall volume of Deep Heet. In keeping with Slater’s recent forward-thinking self-assessments like the “Planetary Funk” anniversary series, this is simultaneously a summary of past successes and another new evolution in style and content. This new set of four highly concentrated cuts shows how effective Planetary Assault Systems can be at fueling the imagination by fusing together rhythmic and incidental elements into a unified, animated meshwork, without even a prominent melody to help out. For example, on the compelling track “Lazer Organical,” listeners will find themselves in the midst of a testing range where thick arcs of coherent plasma ricochet off of the walls.

Deep Heet Vol. 4 also showcases Slater’s aptitude for choosing just the right moments to deviate from a steady groove: on the mesmerizing bubblebath of “Random Kingdom,” he allows listeners to sink into the rising sonic foam before interjecting with some sharp metallic hits. The leadoff track “Desert Races” proceeds in similar fashion, weaving a web of luminous sequencer patterns around the listener before and cutting in with sudden fluctuations or distortions that function like a hypnotist’s suggestions after an entranced patient has become fully responsive. “Life Rhythm,” on the other hand, is a total immersion session in which Slater’s presence seems to recede into the background and listeners themselves may begin imagining overtones and sonic ephemera that weren’t programmed into the original track.

 

Listen:

 

Full Track Streaming:
“Random Kingdom”

 

Video:
“Desert Races”

Video made by the29nov films

 

Specials:
“The Light Years Mix”

 

Recommendations:
album “Arc Angel” on Ostgut Ton
album “The Messenger” on Ostgut Ton
remix album “The Light Years Reworks” on Mote-Evolver
EP “Function 4 (Remixes Episode 2)” on Mote-Evolver

 

Buy Vinyl:
Hardwax
Deejay
Decks
Red Eye Records
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
soon

 

Booking:
Paramount Artists

 

Websites:
Planetary Assault Systems
Mote-Evolver

 

© Photo By Alex Kurunis
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out now: RoogUnit – Mesh EP [Mote-Evolver]

June 2, 2017
 

Artist:
RoogUnit

 

Title:
Mesh EP

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTE049

 

Release Date:
02nd June 2017

 

Format:
vinyl & digital

 

Tracklist :
A1.
Mesh

A2.
Bugeye

B1.
The Chains

 

Press Info:
The full dose of “Mesh” shows two producers clearly at their most focused and precise. Like their best work to date, it will get fans’ active imaginations churning – and leave them wondering what thiscollaboration has in store for the near future.

Roog Unit is the new production duo fusing together the talents of Luke Slater and Ø [Phase] a.k.a. Ashley Burchett, the music being the result of many months of discourse and growing connection. They have already joined forces in the recent past: Ø [Phase] contributed a striking remix of the Planetary Assault Systems classic “Dungeon” for the radical reassessment program “Planetary Funk: 22 Light Years,” and the two shared DJ duties during last year’s “22 Light Years” tour.

The apt title of the debut EP for Mote Evolver, “Mesh,” suggests a locked grid or set of axes on top of which all sorts of creative possibilities can be sketched out, and it provides a perfect descriptive metaphor for the interaction between these two skillful heads: like carefully interwoven strands, neither half of the duo dominates the proceedings and each individual’s contribution strengthens the effect of the other’s.

The self-titled leadoff track on “Mesh” is a bracing bombardment of the senses, pulling out all the stops in order to get ever closer to a white-hot core of intensity. This journey to the heart of the sun moves along at a rapid pace, but also with a sense of patience, as new sound elements fade in slowly and surely. Chugging bass sequences, metallic flutters and sparkling high-register arpeggiation all make this into a piece of contained chaos that will engage veteran listeners and certainly teach novices a thing or two.

Before the listener has fully caught his or her breath, “Bugeye” follows suit and proves that the winning formula of the previous track is no one-off affair. A characteristically high-impact percussive track forms the base from which Burchett and Slater implement their plans for layering sonic architecture. Here their experience and determination truly differentiate them from the pack – where others might pile on sounds into an indistinct and fatiguing audio mush, this pair overlaps numerous different tone colors without causing any of them to lose their individual character.

The flipside, “The Chains,” is a quintessential late night / early dawn number that leads listeners down subterranean corridors lined with beams of luminescent light and populated by smoke-shrouded men of mystery. On this cut, eerie shivering sonorities float in with all the classic drama of sustained Hammond organ chords; a bed of sound on top of which a cool vocal recitation encourages listeners that everything will be “all right” – although the tension between this laidback narration and the demanding straight-ahead trajectory of the music will allow listeners to make up their own minds on that score.

The full dose of “Mesh” shows two producers clearly at their most focused and precise. Like their best work to date, it will get fans’ active imaginations churning – and leave them wondering what this collaboration has in store for the near future.

 

Listen:

 

Full Track Streaming:
“The Chains”

 

Specials:
Luke Slater – “Electronic Explorations 405”

Ø [Phase] – “Dekmantel Podcast 010”

 

Recommendations:
all Mote-Evolver releases

 

Buy Vinyl:
deejay.de
HHV
Decks
Juno
Red Eye Records
Clone
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
soon

 

Booking:
Paramount Artists for Luke Slater
Dystopian for Ø [Phase]

 

Websites:
Ø [Phase]
Luke Slater
Mote-Evolver

 
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out now: Planetary Assault Systems – The Light Years Reworks [Mote-Evolver]

February 7, 2017
 

Artist:
Planetary Assault Systems

 

Title:
The Light Years Reworks

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTELP03

 

Release Date:
10th March 2017

 

Format:
vinyl & digital

 

Tracklist Vinyl:
A1.
Twelve
(Marcel Fengler Rework)

A2.
Diesel Drudge
(Function Rework)

B1.
Surface Noise
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

B2.
Twelve
(Psyk Rework)

C1.
Booster
(Octave One Rework)

C2.
Function 6
(KSP Rework)

D1.
Surface Noise
(Lucy Rework)

E1.
Raid
(Steve Bicknell Rework)

E2.
Tap Dance
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

F1.
Temporary Suspension
(SLAM Rework)

F2.
Whistle Viper
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

 

Tracklist Digital:
01.
Twelve
(Marcel Fengler Rework)

02.
Diesel Drudge
(Function Rework)

03.
Surface Noise
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

04.
Twelve
(Psyk Rework)

05.
Booster
(Octave One Rework)

06.
Function 6
(KSP Rework)

07.
Surface Noise
(Lucy Rework)

08.
Raid
(Steve Bicknell Rework)

09.
Tap Dance
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

10.
Temporary Suspension
(SLAM Rework)

11.
Whistle Viper
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

12.
Function 4
(James Ruskin Rework)

13.
The Light Years MegamixOriginal Mix

 

Press Info:
Having already unleashed a considerable amount of collaborative magic with the “Planetary Funk: 22 Light Years” series of remix EPs, Luke Slater has now upped the ante with six full sides’ worth of material, all of them injecting the spirit of classic P.A.S. into new sonic organisms. Using motifs from past P.A.S. successes, Luke Slater and his cohorts join here to make something radical and revitalizing: too cohesive for a “compilation album” and with too much autonomy granted to the guest remixers to be a simple “tribute,” this new LP is the boldest statement in the series yet.

Three of the tracks in the program are intense and captivating live re-workings from Slater himself, hurtling from the speakers with an apparent minimum of post-production polish and an optimal level of buzzing energy. The first of these, his new “Surface Noise” treatment, sends listeners wading through a dark pool of restlessly throbbing sound with a single buzz-tone as a beacon, adding new percussive fuel to keep the journey going just when it seems all will fade into enveloping darkness. “Tap Dance” brings a brighter sound set to the mix, but without forsaking the trademark steamrolling bass and the contrasting effect of gravity-resistant ephemeral sound clouds. The last reworking, “Whistle Viper,” caps off this ‘set-within-a-set’ in similar fashion.

While this on its own would make for a compelling listen, the album is also laden with contributions from an international assembly of electronic soul controllers (to wit: Marcel Fengler, Psyk, Lucy, Slam, Octave One, Function and KSP). Fengler kicks off the proceedings with an ecstatic and lustrous rework of “Twelve,” a melodic sunrise joining a synth pad massage to a locked-in and systematic rhythm. Psyk’s own interpretation of the same track preserves the same insistence but applies it to a completely different time and place, driving the listener through a wilderness of coded signals and an ambiguous repetition of the title that sounds like it could be as much a warning as an indicator of progress.

KSP’s version of “Function 6” gradually builds a cyborg leitmotif from an overdriven martial beat and epileptic machine breakdowns – a fascinating audio case study of perfect discipline disintegrating into something rather unexpected. Sequencing this with Octave One’s “Booster” rework is an ideal choice, as the squared-away EBM / electro-funk sequences and flanged hi-hats seem to refer to a different phase in the life cycle of the same machine. Function’s “Diesel Drudge,” on the other hand, moves from the machine world into a totally oneiric world typified by backwards-masked / time-traveling voices and a thick strobe-lit haze. Taking a cue from this atmosphere is Lucy’s re-envisioning of “Surface Noise”, in which he doubles down on the original’s feel of liquefied darkness to create a piece of endlessly vibrating sonic mesmerism, a no-nonsense tantric exercise in shedding preconceptions and inhibitions.

Rounding out the collection is Steve Bicknell’s “Raid” version – a breathing mosaic of rhythmic pulses and clattering objects – and Slam’s characteristically intense modification of “Temporary Suspension,” whose low-end sequences continually bubble and seethe yet never completely boil over.

 

Listen:

 

Full Track Streaming:
“Function 4 (James Ruskin Rework)”

“Booster (Octave One Rework)”

“Surface Noise (Lucy Rework)”

“Twelve (Marcel Fengler Rework)”

“Temporary Suspension (Slam Rework)”

“Raid (Steve Bicknell Remix)”

 

Specials:
“Ostgut Ton Radio Mix”

 

Recommendations:
album “Arc Angel” on Ostgut Ton
album “The Messenger” on Ostgut Ton
EP “Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 2)” on Mote-Evolver
EP “Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 1)” on Mote-Evolver
EP “Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 1)” on Mote-Evolver

 

Buy Vinyl:
Deejay
WOM
HHV
Decks
Juno
Red Eye Records
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
Beatport Classic
JunoDownload
more soon

 

Booking:
Paramount Artists

 

Websites:
Planetary Assault Systems
Mote-Evolver

 

© Photo By Paul Krause
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out now: Sev Dah | Jeff Rushin – Parallel Series 5 [Mote-Evolver]

October 5, 2016
 

Artist:
Sev Dah | Jeff Rushin

 

Title:
Parallel Series 5

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTE048

 

Release Date:
28th October 2016

 

Format:
12″ & digital

 

Tracklist:
A1.
Sev Dah
Svarog

A2.
Sev Dah
Morana

AA1
Jeff Rushin
Solex

AA2.
Jeff Rushin
Obsolete

 

Press Info:
Three long years after it last graced our ears, the Parallel Series is back with a new pair of well-established producers. This fifth edition sees Sev Dah and Jeff Rushin take on a side each; the result being four expertly crafted pieces of techno aimed straight for early mornings on darker dance floors.

Sev Dah doesn’t mess about, opening the A side with Svarog, a fierce workout with rough rolling percussion and a pleasingly off kilter melodic line. We’re then taken deeper with Morana, a winding adventure with the mood of those early Detroit tracks but with the production values of today, and an evolving, transcendental melody sure to take dancers to another place.

Jeff Rushin begins the AA with what has to be the most disorienting track on the release. A distant kick drum disassociates you from the rising intensity of a ringing synth line, before the two gradually fall together with added percussion to bring your head back into the right space. The release ends with Obsolete, a track that quickly disregards its name by filling the audio spectrum with layers of dissonant panning and shuffling hats. This one was clearly produced to bring clubbers to attention and throw a curveball at sets of otherwise traditional techno.

 

Listen:

 

Specials:
Sev Dah – “techno.rundgng Podcast 003”

Jeff Rushin – “Erratic Podcast 122”

 

Recommendations:
Parallel Series 1
Parallel Series 2
Parallel Series 3
Parallel Series 4

 

Buy Vinyl:
deejay.de
decks.de
Juno
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
Beatport Classic
JunoDownload
Google Play
iTunes
more soon

 

Websites:
Sev Dah
Jeff Rushin
Mote-Evolver