Archive for the ‘Mote-Evolver’ Category

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out now: RoogUnit – Mesh EP [Mote-Evolver]

June 2, 2017
 

Artist:
RoogUnit

 

Title:
Mesh EP

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTE049

 

Release Date:
02nd June 2017

 

Format:
vinyl & digital

 

Tracklist :
A1.
Mesh

A2.
Bugeye

B1.
The Chains

 

Press Info:
The full dose of “Mesh” shows two producers clearly at their most focused and precise. Like their best work to date, it will get fans’ active imaginations churning – and leave them wondering what thiscollaboration has in store for the near future.

Roog Unit is the new production duo fusing together the talents of Luke Slater and Ø [Phase] a.k.a. Ashley Burchett, the music being the result of many months of discourse and growing connection. They have already joined forces in the recent past: Ø [Phase] contributed a striking remix of the Planetary Assault Systems classic “Dungeon” for the radical reassessment program “Planetary Funk: 22 Light Years,” and the two shared DJ duties during last year’s “22 Light Years” tour.

The apt title of the debut EP for Mote Evolver, “Mesh,” suggests a locked grid or set of axes on top of which all sorts of creative possibilities can be sketched out, and it provides a perfect descriptive metaphor for the interaction between these two skillful heads: like carefully interwoven strands, neither half of the duo dominates the proceedings and each individual’s contribution strengthens the effect of the other’s.

The self-titled leadoff track on “Mesh” is a bracing bombardment of the senses, pulling out all the stops in order to get ever closer to a white-hot core of intensity. This journey to the heart of the sun moves along at a rapid pace, but also with a sense of patience, as new sound elements fade in slowly and surely. Chugging bass sequences, metallic flutters and sparkling high-register arpeggiation all make this into a piece of contained chaos that will engage veteran listeners and certainly teach novices a thing or two.

Before the listener has fully caught his or her breath, “Bugeye” follows suit and proves that the winning formula of the previous track is no one-off affair. A characteristically high-impact percussive track forms the base from which Burchett and Slater implement their plans for layering sonic architecture. Here their experience and determination truly differentiate them from the pack – where others might pile on sounds into an indistinct and fatiguing audio mush, this pair overlaps numerous different tone colors without causing any of them to lose their individual character.

The flipside, “The Chains,” is a quintessential late night / early dawn number that leads listeners down subterranean corridors lined with beams of luminescent light and populated by smoke-shrouded men of mystery. On this cut, eerie shivering sonorities float in with all the classic drama of sustained Hammond organ chords; a bed of sound on top of which a cool vocal recitation encourages listeners that everything will be “all right” – although the tension between this laidback narration and the demanding straight-ahead trajectory of the music will allow listeners to make up their own minds on that score.

The full dose of “Mesh” shows two producers clearly at their most focused and precise. Like their best work to date, it will get fans’ active imaginations churning – and leave them wondering what this collaboration has in store for the near future.

 

Listen:

 

Full Track Streaming:
“The Chains”

 

Specials:
Luke Slater – “Electronic Explorations 405”

Ø [Phase] – “Dekmantel Podcast 010”

 

Recommendations:
all Mote-Evolver releases

 

Buy Vinyl:
deejay.de
HHV
Decks
Juno
Red Eye Records
Clone
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
soon

 

Booking:
Paramount Artists for Luke Slater
Dystopian for Ø [Phase]

 

Websites:
Ø [Phase]
Luke Slater
Mote-Evolver

 
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out now: Planetary Assault Systems – The Light Years Reworks [Mote-Evolver]

February 7, 2017
 

Artist:
Planetary Assault Systems

 

Title:
The Light Years Reworks

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTELP03

 

Release Date:
10th March 2017

 

Format:
vinyl & digital

 

Tracklist Vinyl:
A1.
Twelve
(Marcel Fengler Rework)

A2.
Diesel Drudge
(Function Rework)

B1.
Surface Noise
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

B2.
Twelve
(Psyk Rework)

C1.
Booster
(Octave One Rework)

C2.
Function 6
(KSP Rework)

D1.
Surface Noise
(Lucy Rework)

E1.
Raid
(Steve Bicknell Rework)

E2.
Tap Dance
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

F1.
Temporary Suspension
(SLAM Rework)

F2.
Whistle Viper
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

 

Tracklist Digital:
01.
Twelve
(Marcel Fengler Rework)

02.
Diesel Drudge
(Function Rework)

03.
Surface Noise
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

04.
Twelve
(Psyk Rework)

05.
Booster
(Octave One Rework)

06.
Function 6
(KSP Rework)

07.
Surface Noise
(Lucy Rework)

08.
Raid
(Steve Bicknell Rework)

09.
Tap Dance
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

10.
Temporary Suspension
(SLAM Rework)

11.
Whistle Viper
(P.A.S. Live Rework)

12.
Function 4
(James Ruskin Rework)

13.
The Light Years MegamixOriginal Mix

 

Press Info:
Having already unleashed a considerable amount of collaborative magic with the “Planetary Funk: 22 Light Years” series of remix EPs, Luke Slater has now upped the ante with six full sides’ worth of material, all of them injecting the spirit of classic P.A.S. into new sonic organisms. Using motifs from past P.A.S. successes, Luke Slater and his cohorts join here to make something radical and revitalizing: too cohesive for a “compilation album” and with too much autonomy granted to the guest remixers to be a simple “tribute,” this new LP is the boldest statement in the series yet.

Three of the tracks in the program are intense and captivating live re-workings from Slater himself, hurtling from the speakers with an apparent minimum of post-production polish and an optimal level of buzzing energy. The first of these, his new “Surface Noise” treatment, sends listeners wading through a dark pool of restlessly throbbing sound with a single buzz-tone as a beacon, adding new percussive fuel to keep the journey going just when it seems all will fade into enveloping darkness. “Tap Dance” brings a brighter sound set to the mix, but without forsaking the trademark steamrolling bass and the contrasting effect of gravity-resistant ephemeral sound clouds. The last reworking, “Whistle Viper,” caps off this ‘set-within-a-set’ in similar fashion.

While this on its own would make for a compelling listen, the album is also laden with contributions from an international assembly of electronic soul controllers (to wit: Marcel Fengler, Psyk, Lucy, Slam, Octave One, Function and KSP). Fengler kicks off the proceedings with an ecstatic and lustrous rework of “Twelve,” a melodic sunrise joining a synth pad massage to a locked-in and systematic rhythm. Psyk’s own interpretation of the same track preserves the same insistence but applies it to a completely different time and place, driving the listener through a wilderness of coded signals and an ambiguous repetition of the title that sounds like it could be as much a warning as an indicator of progress.

KSP’s version of “Function 6” gradually builds a cyborg leitmotif from an overdriven martial beat and epileptic machine breakdowns – a fascinating audio case study of perfect discipline disintegrating into something rather unexpected. Sequencing this with Octave One’s “Booster” rework is an ideal choice, as the squared-away EBM / electro-funk sequences and flanged hi-hats seem to refer to a different phase in the life cycle of the same machine. Function’s “Diesel Drudge,” on the other hand, moves from the machine world into a totally oneiric world typified by backwards-masked / time-traveling voices and a thick strobe-lit haze. Taking a cue from this atmosphere is Lucy’s re-envisioning of “Surface Noise”, in which he doubles down on the original’s feel of liquefied darkness to create a piece of endlessly vibrating sonic mesmerism, a no-nonsense tantric exercise in shedding preconceptions and inhibitions.

Rounding out the collection is Steve Bicknell’s “Raid” version – a breathing mosaic of rhythmic pulses and clattering objects – and Slam’s characteristically intense modification of “Temporary Suspension,” whose low-end sequences continually bubble and seethe yet never completely boil over.

 

Listen:

 

Full Track Streaming:
“Function 4 (James Ruskin Rework)”

“Booster (Octave One Rework)”

“Surface Noise (Lucy Rework)”

“Twelve (Marcel Fengler Rework)”

“Temporary Suspension (Slam Rework)”

 

Specials:
“Ostgut Ton Radio Mix”

 

Recommendations:
album “Arc Angel” on Ostgut Ton
album “The Messenger” on Ostgut Ton
EP “Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 2)” on Mote-Evolver
EP “Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 1)” on Mote-Evolver
EP “Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 1)” on Mote-Evolver

 

Buy Vinyl:
Deejay
WOM
HHV
Decks
Juno
Red Eye Records
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
Beatport Classic
JunoDownload
more soon

 

Booking:
Paramount Artists

 

Websites:
Planetary Assault Systems
Mote-Evolver

 

© Photo By Paul Krause
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out now: Sev Dah | Jeff Rushin – Parallel Series 5 [Mote-Evolver]

October 5, 2016
 

Artist:
Sev Dah | Jeff Rushin

 

Title:
Parallel Series 5

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTE048

 

Release Date:
28th October 2016

 

Format:
12″ & digital

 

Tracklist:
A1.
Sev Dah
Svarog

A2.
Sev Dah
Morana

AA1
Jeff Rushin
Solex

AA2.
Jeff Rushin
Obsolete

 

Press Info:
Three long years after it last graced our ears, the Parallel Series is back with a new pair of well-established producers. This fifth edition sees Sev Dah and Jeff Rushin take on a side each; the result being four expertly crafted pieces of techno aimed straight for early mornings on darker dance floors.

Sev Dah doesn’t mess about, opening the A side with Svarog, a fierce workout with rough rolling percussion and a pleasingly off kilter melodic line. We’re then taken deeper with Morana, a winding adventure with the mood of those early Detroit tracks but with the production values of today, and an evolving, transcendental melody sure to take dancers to another place.

Jeff Rushin begins the AA with what has to be the most disorienting track on the release. A distant kick drum disassociates you from the rising intensity of a ringing synth line, before the two gradually fall together with added percussion to bring your head back into the right space. The release ends with Obsolete, a track that quickly disregards its name by filling the audio spectrum with layers of dissonant panning and shuffling hats. This one was clearly produced to bring clubbers to attention and throw a curveball at sets of otherwise traditional techno.

 

Listen:

 

Specials:
Sev Dah – “techno.rundgng Podcast 003”

Jeff Rushin – “Erratic Podcast 122”

 

Recommendations:
Parallel Series 1
Parallel Series 2
Parallel Series 3
Parallel Series 4

 

Buy Vinyl:
deejay.de
decks.de
Juno
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
Beatport Classic
more soon

 

Websites:
Sev Dah
Jeff Rushin
Mote-Evolver

 
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out now: Planetary Assault Systems – Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 2) [Mote-Evolver]

June 21, 2016
 

Artist:
Planetary Assault Systems

 

Title:
Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 2)

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTE047

 

Release Date:
8th July 2016

 

Format:
12inch & digital

 

Tracklist:
A)
Kat
(Josh Wink Re-Interpretation)

B)
Kat

 

Press Info:
Fresh off of his re-activation of the seminal “Planetary Funk” series, Luke Slater delivers another new 12” with all of the purposeful intensity and sonic clarity to be expected from his celebrated Planetary Assault Systems alias. Pairing both an original mix and a spirited re-working by Josh Wink, “Kat” is a winning synthesis of all the elements that make P.A.S. such a continually relevant player in the game of moving bodies and opening minds: it once again pushes beat-driven sound to disciplined extremes, but not without clearly detectable traces of humor and playfulness.

As vocal repetition of the track’s simplistic and suggestive title is run through a maze of filters, pitch-shifts and delays, an equally busy set of tubular bass figures mirrors this approach and meshes with the insistent rhythm. Carefully inserted hard stops, crafty fading of sound from background to foreground, and unexpected breakdowns give the track a kind of restless feel that ensures its success as a peak hour selection, or as a reliable companion on inner-city underground transit journeys.

While the original mix on the b-side begins in a more subdued fashion, it isn’t lacking at all in concentrated energy. As is the case with so many other P.A.S. classics, this mix relies on geometrical sound sequences that slowly approach from a distance before they completely overtake the listener. Elements like static crackling are wielded here like active parts of the conversation rather than as atmospheric wallpaper, and the beat itself hits with a mixture of force and subtlety, with anxious drum hits doubling up on one another and regularly giving rise to new patterns.

“Kat” is the kind of record that gives Planetary Assault Systems fans both what they want, and what they didn’t expect: it steers away from easy techno conventions but never abandons that genre’s physicality and infectiousness.

Words by Thomas Bey William Bailey

 

Listen:

 

Full Track Streaming:
“Kat (Josh Wink Re-Interpretation)”

 

Related Releases:
“Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 1)”
Single “Kat / Haiku”

 

Recommendations:
EP “No Exit” on Mote-Evolver
EP “Future Modular” on Mote-Evolver
EP “The Eyes Themselves” on Mote-Evolver

 

Special:
“Boiler Room & Ballantine’s Stay True Scotland Live Set”

 

Buy Vinyl:
deejay.de
Juno
Red Eye Records
HHV
Bleep
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
Beatport Classic
JunoDownload
WhatPeoplePlay
Boomkat
Bleep
Google Play
more soon

 

Booking:
Paramount Artists

 

Websites:
Planetary Assault Systems
Planetary Assault Systems @ Facebook
Mote-Evolver
Mote-Evolver @ Facebook

 
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out now: Planetary Assault Systems – Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 1) [Mote-Evolver]

May 13, 2016
 

Artist:
Planetary Assault Systems

 

Title:
Planetary Funk 22 Light Years (Part 1)

 

Label:
Mote-Evolver

 

Cat#:
MOTE046

 

Release Date:
27th May 2016

 

Format:
12inch & digital

 

Tracklist:
01)
Dungeon
(Ø [Phase] Remix)

02)
Gated
(Ben Sims Edit)

03)
Dungeon

 

Press Info:
It’s almost hard to believe that the original series of “Planetary Funk” 12”s by Planetary Assault Systems dates back to the early 1990s, given the continued relevance of this hard-edged suite of tracks, and their ease of integration into present-day techno sets. Characterized by their unflagging momentum and by almost militaristic deployment of techno’s atomic particles – submachine-gun handclaps, acid-soaked bass patterns, the icy chatter of ride and hi-hat cymbals – the spirit of these tracks has never really vacated the club scene. The 21st century re-activation of the Planetary Funk moniker isn’t a nostalgic look backwards so much as an expansion of its original mission.

Leading off the proceedings on this first volume is “Dungeon,” a 1997 original from P.A.S. which already shows this unit transitioning from the fierce, frantic atmosphere of the earlier Planetary Funk EPs into something more akin to the project’s present-day approach: not more “laid back” by a long shot, but more mesmerizing and loaded with anticipation. The repeated slow fade-in and detuned drop-out of a wasp-like hum is just one fascinating feature of this eerie track, which also includes other ephemeral activities occurring on the perimeter and a glassy rhythmic figure which snares your concentration and refuses to let go.

The Ø [Phase] remix of “Dungeon” also takes the listener to a dark place of uncertainty and possible hidden dangers, but with more vigor and percussive intensity added to the mix: with an extra (over)dose of vibrato added to the signature hum from the original, with more force added to the kick drums, and more variety in the dialogue between other percussive strikes, listening to this paint-peeling, stomping creation is an exhilarating man-machine experience like snaking a motorbike at high speed through gridlocked traffic.

Not to be outdone, Ben Sims appears on the scene as well with a re-envisioning of “Gated,” from the first Planetary Funk A-side. Retaining all the controlled chaos which made this track a classic, Sims adds more of his own fuel to the fire by downtuning the bass, re-adjusting the tempo and adding extra distortion on the slamming kicks. Utilizing a full complement of additional tensionbuilding techniques, Sims doesn’t try to upstage the original but does try to show a definite evolutionary process at work. In fact, the whole record is a celebration of this evolution, showing how Planetary Funk has naturally adapted to strange new times, but has kept its soul and character intact.

Words by Thomas Bey William Bailey

 

Listen:

 

Video:
“Dungeon”

Video created by the29nov films.

 

Recommendations:
“Function 4 (Remixes – Episode 2)” on Mote-Evolver
EP “No Exit” on Mote-Evolver
EP “Future Modular” on Mote-Evolver
EP “The Eyes Themselves” on Mote-Evolver

 

Special:
“Electronic Explorations – 405”

 

Buy Vinyl:
deejay.de
decks.de
Juno
Red Eye Records
clone.nl
HHV
djshop.de
Bleep
Hardwax
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
Beatport Classic
Boomkat
Bleep
more soon

 

Booking:
Paramount Artists

 

Websites:
Planetary Assault Systems
Planetary Assault Systems @ Facebook
Mote-Evolver
Mote-Evolver @ Facebook